Is Sarah Houbolt Blind? Disability & Special Needs Explained Of The Actress

Sarah Houbolt is legally blind, but her performance as the unsettling man in Three Thousand Years of Longing set fires.

Sarah Houbolt is an international circus and physical theatre performer, entertainer, and activist who began her career as a Paralympian. Her award-winning work includes advocating disability arts narratives and history and investigating accessibility aesthetics.

A talented S12 swimmer, Houbolt earned three gold and one silver medal at the 1999 FESPIC Games in Bangkok, Thailand. Her times in the Women’s 100 m Breaststroke SB12 and Women’s 100 m Butterfly S12 at the 2000 Sydney Paralympics were seventh and eighth, respectively.

Shortly after, she jumped into the world of circus and physical theater events.

Sarah Houbolt is legally blind and has only partial sight. The actress was born with the rare Hallermann-Streiff syndrome, which affects her bone structure. The syndrome is responsible for her height of only 144 centimeters. 

Access issues for people with disabilities are more complicated than most people would like to believe. Sarah Houbolt uses her unique perspective to do her part in making spaces and society more inclusive.

Her work promotes a more specific approach to accessibility in design, education, employment, and innovation. Sarah began talking about disability when she was five years old, with her first media interview.

Audio description is something she regularly tries to incorporate into her artistic work. She likes to explain everything from what she is doing to her performance setup in order to create universal access. 

Houbolt graduated from the University of Queensland with a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Social Work. She has experience in the field of arts administration.

Sarah Houbolt was born to supportive parents on December 23, 1983, in Townsville, Queensland, Houbolt.

Access issues for people with disabilities are more complicated than most people would like to believe. Sarah Houbolt uses her unique perspective to do her part in making spaces and society more inclusive.

Her work promotes a more specific approach to accessibility in design, education, employment, and innovation. Sarah began talking about disability when she was five years old, with her first media interview.

Audio description is something she regularly tries to incorporate into her artistic work. She likes to explain everything from what she is doing to her performance setup in order to create universal access. 

Houbolt graduated from the University of Queensland with a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Social Work. She has experience in the field of arts administration.