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What Happened To Daria Dugina? Military Expert Alexander Dugin Daughter Died In Explosion

On Saturday night in Moscow, a car belonging to the daughter of the famous Russian politician Alexander Dugin blew up.

A police source told Sputnik that a car had caught fire in the Moscow area’s Odintsovsky District.

Some western experts call Dugin “Putin’s brain” and think that he is in charge of Russia’s “military operations” in Crimea and Ukraine.

What Did Daria Dugina Do?

Witnesses say that Daria Dugina’s car blew up at 9:45 p.m. on the Mozhayskoye highway. The explosion shook the car in the middle of the road, and its pieces are said to have gone everywhere.

Early reports said that she died right away, before her father could even see her one last time. A video shared on social media shows that senior Alexander Dugin showed up at the crash site on Mozhayskoye Highway later.

Putin’s men tried desperately to shoot down the UAV. In a video, you can hear multiple gunshots, but the attack still happened, sending smoke into the air.

Several articles in Russian media say that the explosion happened before the Land Cruiser Prado crashed into it.

The official report on what caused the explosion has not been made yet. No one knows if her father was the target of a plot to kill him when the explosion happened.

Alexander Dugin’s Daughter Died, and Her Death Announcement

Gazeta said that Aleksander Dugin’s daughter Daria Dugina may have died in a car explosion in a town outside of Moscow. Aleksander Dugin is a close adviser to Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Peter Lundstrom, a friend of Darya’s, said that they were about to leave the family celebration at the Zakharovo farm when he got into another car.

The Sun said that instead, Darya was caught off guard by a huge explosion in the jeep.

Local news outlets quickly said that the explosion was an attempt to kill the Russian author.

Dugina worked as a journalist and got degrees in both political science and philosophy.

The United States Treasury also put sanctions on Darya after she was hired as the chief editor at the United World International (UWI) website. This website belonged to Yevgeny Prigozhin, who is thought to have interfered in the 2016 presidential election between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

Daria Dugina Land Cruiser Prado Explosion And Update

On the side of the road, Daria Dugina’s Land Cruiser Prado was on fire, and at least one fire truck came to help. A video allegedly taken at the scene of the explosion is going viral on social media.

Denis Pushilin, the leader of the eastern Ukrainian separatist group Donetsk People’s Republic, said that Ukrainian “terrorists” “blew up” Dugin’s daughter, even though it was untrue that this was a hit gone wrong.

Pushilin wrote on Telegram, “Daria is a real Russian girl. She was killed when terrorists from the Ukrainian regime tried to kill Alexander Dugin by blowing up his daughter in a car.”

Dugin is a far-right occult author who used to be the editor of the strongly pro-Putin Tsargrad TV network. He is considered the Russian warmonger’s “guru advisor” even though he doesn’t work for the government and has a big influence on him.

Dailymail.com said that Alexander’s attempted murder became public shortly after a kamikaze drone strike on Crimea’s Russian Navy headquarters on Saturday, which was said to be part of another Ukrainian raid and caused a huge explosi

Alexander Dugin Bio/Wiki

Geliy Alexandrovich Dugin, a colonel-general in the Soviet military intelligence and candidate of law, and his wife Galina, a doctor and candidate of medicine, raised Dugin in Moscow. When he was three, his father left the family, but he made sure they had a good life and sometimes helped Dugin get out of trouble with the law. Because of how his son was acting in 1983, he was moved to the customs service. Aleksandr went to the Moscow Aviation Institute in 1979, but he was kicked out. After that, he got a job as a street cleaner and used a fake reader’s card to keep studying at the Lenin Library. Other sources, though, say that he started working instead in a KGB archive, where he could read banned books about Masonry, fascism, and paganism.

In 1980, Dugin joined the “Yuzhinsky group,” a group of dissidents who were interested in Satanism and other occult practices. In the group, he was known for being a Nazi sympathizer, which he says was more of a rebellion against his Soviet upbringing than a real liking for Hitler. He made up a fake name for himself, “Hans Siever.” This was a reference to Wolfram Sievers, a Nazi who studied the supernatural. He taught himself to speak Italian, German, French, English, and Spanish by himself. He also read Julius Evola’s works in the V. I. Lenin State Library and came to agree with the Traditionalist School’s ideas.

His first wife was a Russian activist named Evgenia Debryanskaya. They have a son who they named Artur after the poet Arthur Rimbaud.

When her car exploded on August 20, 2022, in the village of Bolshiye Vyazyomy outside of Moscow, Dugin’s daughter Darya shattered into a million pieces. No one has yet found out what caused the explosion.

Job and political beliefs

Dugin was a rebel and an anti-communist in the 1980s. Before getting involved in politics, just before communism fell, Dugin worked as a journalist. In 1988, he and his friend Geydar Dzhemal joined the ultranationalist group Pamyat (Memory), which later gave rise to Russian fascism. He helped write the new political plan for the Communist Party of the Russian Federation, which was led by Gennady Zyuganov after it was reformed.

Career in publishing

In 1997, Dugin wrote a book called Foundations of Geopolitics. This book is used as a textbook at the Academy of the General Staff of the Russian military. [Citation needed] It also worries political scientists in the US, who sometimes call it “Russia’s Manifest Destiny.” Also in 1997, in an article called “Fascism – Borderless and Red,” he said that “national capitalism” stopped “real, true, radically revolutionary, and consistent fascist fascism” from growing in Russia. He thinks it must have been “It wasn’t at all the racism and chauvinism of National Socialism that made it what it was. In Germany, only the Germans care about how far this ideology goes, while in Russia, fascism is a mix of natural national conservatism and a strong desire for real changes.” He said that the Waffen-SS, and especially its scientific branch, Ahnenerbe, was “an intellectual oasis within the framework of the National Socialist regime.”

Soon after, Dugin started his own journal called Elementy. In the first issue, he praised the French-Belgian Jean-Francois Thiriart, who later became a supporter of a “Euro-Soviet empire that would stretch from Dublin to Vladivostok and also need to grow to the south because it needs a port on the Indian Ocean.” Elementy always praised both Tsarist and Stalinist Russia, and he also said that he admired Julius Evola. Dugin also worked with the weekly journal Den (The Day), which was run by Alexander Prokhanov before Dugin got involved.

Dugin doesn’t like liberalism or the West, especially the way the US rules the world

He says, “We are on Stalin’s side and on the side of the Soviet Union.” He says that he is a conservative: “We conservatives want a strong, stable state, order and a healthy family, good values, and the Church and religion’s place in society to be emphasized.” Adding: “We want patriotic radio and TV, as well as patriotic clubs and experts. We want national interests to be shown in the media “. Marlène Laruelle, a political scientist, says that Dugin’s thinking, who is the main creator of “fascism-in-the-Russe,” is like a series of concentric circles, with far-right ideas supported by different political and philosophical traditions (such as Esoteric Nazism, Traditionalism/Perennialism, the German Conservative Revolution, and the European New Right).

Martin Heidegger’s idea of Dasein (Existence) is turned into a geophilosophical idea by Dugin

Dugin says that the forces of liberal and capitalist Western civilization are what the ancient Greeks called (hubris), “the essential form of titanism” (the anti-ideal form), which is the opposite of Heaven (“the ideal form in terms of space, time, and being”). In other words, “the revolt of the Earth against Heaven” is how the West would describe it. Dugin compares what he calls the “atomizing” universalism of the West to what he calls the “apophatic” universalism of the idea of “empire.” He thinks that values like democracy, human rights, and individualism are not shared by all people, but are specific to the West.

In 2019, Dugin had a debate with French intellectual Bernard-Henri Lévy about what has been called “the crisis of capitalism” and the rise of nationalist populisms.

The views on Eurasianism, Fascism, and Geopolitics

Dugin has supported fascist ideas and thought about how to build a “Euro-Asian empire” that could fight the US-led West. In this way, he was the founder and first leader (along with Eduard Limonov) of the ultranationalist National Bolshevik Party from 1993 to 1998, as well as the National Bolshevik Front and the Eurasia Party, which later became a non-governmental organization. So, Dugin’s Eurasist ideology wants to bring together all Russian-speaking people in a single country by forcing the former Soviet republics to break up into smaller pieces.

At the National Bolshevik Front, where Dugin worked in the early 1990s, he did research on the origins of national movements and the activities of groups that helped esoteric groups in the first half of the 20th century. Partnering with Christian Bouchet, who was a member of the French Ordo Templi Orientis at the time, and building on the national-fascist and migrant-integrative interest groups in Asia and Europe, they help bring international politics closer to Russia’s Eurasian geopolitical concept.

Dugin studied the controversial German scholar Herman Wirth’s (1885–1981) geopolitical, semiotic, and esoteric ideas for two years. Wirth was one of the founders of the German Ahnenerbe. This led to Dugin writing the 1993 book Hyperborean Theory, in which he mostly agreed with Wirth’s ideas as a possible basis for his Eurasianism. “One of the most in-depth summaries and treatments of Wirth in any language,” the author says. [46] Moldavian anthropologist Leonid Mosionjnik Wirth’s outlandish ideas filled the ideological void left by the fall of communism, liberalism, and democracy, Mosionjnik Wirth said. Dugin also spread the story that Wirth had written an important book called the Palestinabuch about the history of the Jewish people and the Old Testament that had been stolen and could have changed the world.

Some nationalists in Turkey have started to pay attention to Dugin’s ideas, especially those about “a Turkic-Slavic alliance in the Eurasian sphere.” This is especially true of alleged members of the Ergenekon network, which is being tried in a very public case (on charges of conspiracy).

[needs citation] People have also said that Dugin’s Eurasianist ideas are linked to his belief in the Traditionalist School’s ideas. J. Heiser wrote a whole book about Dugin’s Traditionalist beliefs called The American Empire Should Be Destroyed: Aleksandr Dugin and the Dangers of Immanentized Eschatology. Dugin also wants Russia and the Arab world to work together.

Geliy Alexandrovich Dugin, a colonel-general in the Soviet military intelligence and candidate of law, and his wife Galina, a doctor and candidate of medicine, raised Dugin in Moscow. When he was three, his father left the family, but he made sure they had a good life and sometimes helped Dugin get out of trouble with the law. Because of how his son was acting in 1983, he was moved to the customs service. Aleksandr went to the Moscow Aviation Institute in 1979, but he was kicked out. After that, he got a job as a street cleaner and used a fake reader’s card to keep studying at the Lenin Library. Other sources, though, say that he started working instead in a KGB archive, where he could read banned books about Masonry, fascism, and paganism.

In 1980, Dugin joined the “Yuzhinsky group,” a group of dissidents who were interested in Satanism and other occult practices. In the group, he was known for being a Nazi sympathizer, which he says was more of a rebellion against his Soviet upbringing than a real liking for Hitler. He made up a fake name for himself, “Hans Siever.” This was a reference to Wolfram Sievers, a Nazi who studied the supernatural. He taught himself to speak Italian, German, French, English, and Spanish by himself. He also read Julius Evola’s works in the V. I. Lenin State Library and came to agree with the Traditionalist School’s ideas.

His first wife was a Russian activist named Evgenia Debryanskaya. They have a son who they named Artur after the poet Arthur Rimbaud.

When her car exploded on August 20, 2022, in the village of Bolshiye Vyazyomy outside of Moscow, Dugin’s daughter Darya shattered into a million pieces. No one has yet found out what caused the explosion.

Job and political beliefs

Dugin was a rebel and an anti-communist in the 1980s. Before getting involved in politics, just before communism fell, Dugin worked as a journalist. In 1988, he and his friend Geydar Dzhemal joined the ultranationalist group Pamyat (Memory), which later gave rise to Russian fascism. He helped write the new political plan for the Communist Party of the Russian Federation, which was led by Gennady Zyuganov after it was reformed.

Career in publishing

In 1997, Dugin wrote a book called Foundations of Geopolitics. This book is used as a textbook at the Academy of the General Staff of the Russian military. [Citation needed] It also worries political scientists in the US, who sometimes call it “Russia’s Manifest Destiny.” Also in 1997, in an article called “Fascism – Borderless and Red,” he said that “national capitalism” stopped “real, true, radically revolutionary, and consistent fascist fascism” from growing in Russia. He thinks it must have been “It wasn’t at all the racism and chauvinism of National Socialism that made it what it was. In Germany, only the Germans care about how far this ideology goes, while in Russia, fascism is a mix of natural national conservatism and a strong desire for real changes.” He said that the Waffen-SS, and especially its scientific branch, Ahnenerbe, was “an intellectual oasis within the framework of the National Socialist regime.”

Soon after, Dugin started his own journal called Elementy. In the first issue, he praised the French-Belgian Jean-Francois Thiriart, who later became a supporter of a “Euro-Soviet empire that would stretch from Dublin to Vladivostok and also need to grow to the south because it needs a port on the Indian Ocean.” Elementy always praised both Tsarist and Stalinist Russia, and he also said that he admired Julius Evola. Dugin also worked with the weekly journal Den (The Day), which was run by Alexander Prokhanov before Dugin got involved.

Dugin doesn’t like liberalism or the West, especially the way the US rules the world

He says, “We are on Stalin’s side and on the side of the Soviet Union.” He says that he is a conservative: “We conservatives want a strong, stable state, order and a healthy family, good values, and the Church and religion’s place in society to be emphasized.” Adding: “We want patriotic radio and TV, as well as patriotic clubs and experts. We want national interests to be shown in the media “. Marlène Laruelle, a political scientist, says that Dugin’s thinking, who is the main creator of “fascism-in-the-Russe,” is like a series of concentric circles, with far-right ideas supported by different political and philosophical traditions (such as Esoteric Nazism, Traditionalism/Perennialism, the German Conservative Revolution, and the European New Right).

Martin Heidegger’s idea of Dasein (Existence) is turned into a geophilosophical idea by Dugin

Dugin says that the forces of liberal and capitalist Western civilization are what the ancient Greeks called (hubris), “the essential form of titanism” (the anti-ideal form), which is the opposite of Heaven (“the ideal form in terms of space, time, and being”). In other words, “the revolt of the Earth against Heaven” is how the West would describe it. Dugin compares what he calls the “atomizing” universalism of the West to what he calls the “apophatic” universalism of the idea of “empire.” He thinks that values like democracy, human rights, and individualism are not shared by all people, but are specific to the West.

In 2019, Dugin had a debate with French intellectual Bernard-Henri Lévy about what has been called “the crisis of capitalism” and the rise of nationalist populisms.

The views on Eurasianism, Fascism, and Geopolitics

Dugin has supported fascist ideas and thought about how to build a “Euro-Asian empire” that could fight the US-led West. In this way, he was the founder and first leader (along with Eduard Limonov) of the ultranationalist National Bolshevik Party from 1993 to 1998, as well as the National Bolshevik Front and the Eurasia Party, which later became a non-governmental organization. So, Dugin’s Eurasist ideology wants to bring together all Russian-speaking people in a single country by forcing the former Soviet republics to break up into smaller pieces.

At the National Bolshevik Front, where Dugin worked in the early 1990s, he did research on the origins of national movements and the activities of groups that helped esoteric groups in the first half of the 20th century. Partnering with Christian Bouchet, who was a member of the French Ordo Templi Orientis at the time, and building on the national-fascist and migrant-integrative interest groups in Asia and Europe, they help bring international politics closer to Russia’s Eurasian geopolitical concept.